Patient X: The Case-Book of Ryunosuke Akutagawa Epub

Patient X: The Case-Book of Ryunosuke Akutagawa Epub

Patient X: The Case-Book of Ryunosuke Akutagawa ➜ [Epub] ❧ Patient X: The Case-Book of Ryunosuke Akutagawa By David Peace ➦ – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Beautiful, gothic and powerfully mysterious ESQUIRE One of the most original and intriguing books you ll read this year MAIL ON SUNDAY His best to date DAVID MITCHELLRyunosuke Akutagawa was one of Jap Beautiful, gothic and powerfully The Case-Book PDF Ê mysterious ESQUIRE One of the most original Patient X: ePUB Ò and intriguing books you ll read this year MAIL ON SUNDAY His X: The Case-Book ePUB ↠ best to date DAVID MITCHELLRyunosuke Akutagawa was one of Japan s great writers author of the stories Rashomon and In a Bamboo Grove , most famously who lived through Japan s turbulent Taisho period ofto , including the devastatingEarthquake, only to take his own life at the age of just thirty five inThese are the stories of Patient X in one of our iron castles He will tell his tales to anyone with the ears and the time to listen Inspired and informed by Akutagawa s stories, essays and letters, David Peace has fashioned a most extraordinary novel of tales An intense, passionate, haunting paean to one writer, it also thrillingly explores the act and obsession of writing itself, and the role of the artist, both in public and private life, in times which darkly mirror our own.


10 thoughts on “Patient X: The Case-Book of Ryunosuke Akutagawa

  1. Mairi Mairi says:

    Rated 2.5 stars rounded up out of respect for the author.When I mentioned I was reading this book to a family member they exclaimed David Peace is the author of both The Damned Utd and Nineteen Seventy Four both apparently fantastic So I felt bad when I didn t enjoy this one very much.I wanted to learn about Ryunosuke Akutagawa, the namesake the Akutagawa prize, and I did a little But the book was hard to read and very, very hard to follow I can t deny it s beautifully written Thoughtfu Rated 2.5 stars rounded up out of respect for the author.When I mentioned I was reading this book to a family member they exclaimed David Peace is the author of both The Damned Utd and Nineteen Seventy Four both apparently fantastic So I felt bad when I didn t enjoy this one very much.I wanted to learn about Ryunosuke Akutagawa, the namesake the Akutagawa prize, and I did a little But the book was hard to read and very, very hard to follow I can t deny it s beautifully written Thoughtful and evocative, yet it jumps around a lot It introduces characters then discards them in the next page and above all seems to be unsure of it s own sense of narrative and identity Someone else mentioned in an earlier review that they d have loved this as an audiobook and I tend to agree One key section I adored was the story in Jack the Ripper s Bedroom , but this one like some of the others, didn t seem to fit with the rest of the book I suppose you can make a connection that Akutagawa is one of the most famous short story writers of all time The story itself is full of mystery and suspense, echoing the book as a whole But this little passage and many others just felt uncomfortable.Like I said, this is a 2.5 star rating because clearly the author is talented I just struggled


  2. Angus McKeogh Angus McKeogh says:

    I think David Peace is one of the best writers out there Style and substance The Red Riding Quartet was phenomenal The Damned UTD is one of the best books I ve ever read Even Tokyo Year Zero and Occupied City two novels about Japan were much better than I anticipated and I really enjoyed them David Mitchell another Anglo author stationed in and writing about Japan states this recent work in one of Peace s best Unfortunately I ll have to respectfully disagree I m still trying to figure I think David Peace is one of the best writers out there Style and substance The Red Riding Quartet was phenomenal The Damned UTD is one of the best books I ve ever read Even Tokyo Year Zero and Occupied City two novels about Japan were much better than I anticipated and I really enjoyed them David Mitchell another Anglo author stationed in and writing about Japan states this recent work in one of Peace s best Unfortunately I ll have to respectfully disagree I m still trying to figure out what it was even about Supremely plotless Just sort of a mishmash of apparent autobiography Disjointed narrative Long stretches of inactivity A title that is esoteric and potentially unrelated to the content I found that even Peace s style didn t lend itself to this novel And since one star is the only GoodReads option for Didn t Like It I have to go with one star on this one Sorry Mitchell, but this is one of his worst


  3. Marc Nash Marc Nash says:

    Review included in review round up video Review included in review round up video


  4. Ben Robinson Ben Robinson says:

    More incantation than any conventional bio, Patient X allows David Peace to fully inhabit the fractured psyche of Ryunosuke Akutagawa and tell his uniquely affecting story.


  5. latner3 latner3 says:

    From on the bridge as i through away the cucumber,the water sounds and thus i see, a bobbed head for Owaka san,by drunken Gaki.


  6. Kelli Santistevan Kelli Santistevan says:

    I won this book from a Goodreads giveaway in 2018 This book is a fictional autobiography of a Japanese writer named Ryunosuke Akutagawa I read about the writer through a page on Wikipedia but I ve never read anything by him and I didn t know anything about him before I started reading this so I wasn t sure if I was going to like this book or not but I wanted to read something different I decided to listen to this on Audible The narrator did a good job narrating This book was written in a w I won this book from a Goodreads giveaway in 2018 This book is a fictional autobiography of a Japanese writer named Ryunosuke Akutagawa I read about the writer through a page on Wikipedia but I ve never read anything by him and I didn t know anything about him before I started reading this so I wasn t sure if I was going to like this book or not but I wanted to read something different I decided to listen to this on Audible The narrator did a good job narrating This book was written in a weird way It kept my attention and I was interested but I had to try really hard to understand what was going on I don t recommend reading this book unless you want to put forth a lot of effort to understand what s going on in the book and it might help to know some background information about the Japanese writer that this book is talking about because I started reading this book not knowing anything about him I listened to it all the way until the end because I wanted to know how it was going to end but it wasn t worth my time


  7. Inka Inka says:

    My experience with the book was weird The writing style is poetic and evocative, but it gets SO convoluted that I struggled to follow Although beautiful, a lot of the different images painted by the author felt awkwardly artificial and disconnected from one another A good deal of it was beautifully written, and clearly the author is a talented writer, but the lack of a cohesive thread and the constant repetition of phrases and adjectives He was in the rain Alone Alone, alone in the rain My experience with the book was weird The writing style is poetic and evocative, but it gets SO convoluted that I struggled to follow Although beautiful, a lot of the different images painted by the author felt awkwardly artificial and disconnected from one another A good deal of it was beautifully written, and clearly the author is a talented writer, but the lack of a cohesive thread and the constant repetition of phrases and adjectives He was in the rain Alone Alone, alone in the rain In the rain All alone were driving me crazy Much to my frustration, I just could not finish this book


  8. Alex Sarll Alex Sarll says:

    The most surprising thing about David Peace s latest is that it s almost easy to read Yes, it opens with the protagonist in Hell, before flashing back to him not wanting to be born, and proceeds to take in ghosts, monsters, madness, catastrophe, and harbingers of worse I don t know why I even bothered looking online to check whether the time at which a clock in Nagasaki always stops is a foreshadowing of the atom bomb this is David Peace, of course it is Oh, and suicide, obviously Lots of The most surprising thing about David Peace s latest is that it s almost easy to read Yes, it opens with the protagonist in Hell, before flashing back to him not wanting to be born, and proceeds to take in ghosts, monsters, madness, catastrophe, and harbingers of worse I don t know why I even bothered looking online to check whether the time at which a clock in Nagasaki always stops is a foreshadowing of the atom bomb this is David Peace, of course it is Oh, and suicide, obviously Lots of it, ritual and otherwise, and one framed by a shaggy dog story which even I was almost embarrassed to find as funny as I did But that harsh, percussive effect you expect from his prose, the way it feels like you re being slapped around the face That s gone I didn t read Red or Dead, because while I enjoyed The Damned Utd there are fucking limits, but apparently it was a sort of endpoint for that style Happily, then, Peace turns out to have other tricks up his sleeve, and can still haunt you even with afluid manner.Our subject is Ry nosuke Akutagawa, father of the Japanese short story and most famously the writer of Rash mon , though if you don t know that coming in, Peace isn t going to hold your hand and have people helpfully exposit about it On the other hand, apparently if you do know Ry nosuke s work well, that has its own problems, as large chunks of this are pretty much paraphrase Given I had the basics but no intimate knowledge of the work, this may make me the ideal reader And the main impression I got was that this was a deeply autobiographical story the boy that books built, growing into the writer forever distracted by other responsibilities , always worried that he s neglecting his family or his art or both, forever terrified that he s lost the knack Hell, even the degree to which the Japanese writer is fascinated by the West, its culture, its crime and its cult, mirrors the way in which Peace has himself been transfixed by Japan It s been particularly interesting reading this while watching the wonderful Ancient Magus Bride, a Japanese cartoon set in Britain, and watching from both sides as these two tradition bound, ruthlessly modern, hidebound, kinky islands at either end of the world continue their awkward dance Indeed, the back cover flap faithfully promises that we ll see the finale to the Tokyo Trilogy next year, so you could even consider this novel, in progress for six years at least, to itself be one of those curious examples of a displacement activity with its own artistic validity I imagine there are probably hot takes floating around somewhere denouncing Patient X as cultural appropriation A concept which I find deeply problematic in general, but particularly when it treats another G7 economy with an imperialist past as somehow equivalent to the developing world simply because the inhabitants aren t white


  9. Beth Beth says:

    Brilliant, evocative writing The jumps in time, theme and style work almost magically well Ryunosuke is a fascinating character pretty solidly based in the actual Ryunosuke Akutagawa s life as far as I can tell Peace is not Japanese and hasn t lived there extensively as far as I can tell but clearly did serious research Now of course I want to read a nonfictional biography of him and read good translations of his works.Highly recommended to fans of literary fiction, biographical and historic Brilliant, evocative writing The jumps in time, theme and style work almost magically well Ryunosuke is a fascinating character pretty solidly based in the actual Ryunosuke Akutagawa s life as far as I can tell Peace is not Japanese and hasn t lived there extensively as far as I can tell but clearly did serious research Now of course I want to read a nonfictional biography of him and read good translations of his works.Highly recommended to fans of literary fiction, biographical and historical fiction based on a real person, and lovers of Japanese literature and culture


  10. Jac Jac says:

    A fictional biography of the famous Japanese author that has some memorable and poignant passages on books and the publishing world, but unfortunately tapers off to a rather bland finish in the second half.


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