Journey to the Moon eBook À Journey to PDF/EPUB or

Journey to the Moon eBook À Journey to PDF/EPUB or


Journey to the Moon ❮Read❯ ➮ Journey to the Moon Author Cyrano de Bergerac – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk What if the moon were another world for which ours served as the moon An absurd notion, but one which leads our narrator to travel to a paradisiacal world in which he is a monster, a malfunction of na What if the moon were another world for which ours served as the moon An absurd notion, but one which leads our narrator to travel to a Journey to PDF/EPUB or paradisiacal world in which he is a monster, a malfunction of nature, and a myth The dream quickly becomes a nightmare, however, when the ruling ecclesiastical courts condemn him for his heretical opinions and illicit beliefs As viewed from the moon, the philosophical, scientific, anthropocentric, and religious certitudes that reign on Earth seem trivial This masterpiece of Libertine literature emerges as an unprecedented example of relativization and a scathing attack on the values and institutions of th century French society The real life Cyrano de Bergerac , made famous by Edmond Rostand, was a dramatist and poet in his prose works, he shows himself to be the forerunner to Jules Verne and Johannes Kepler.


10 thoughts on “Journey to the Moon

  1. Debbie Zapata Debbie Zapata says:

    Cyrano de Bergerac was a real person He wrote poetry, plays, and books, as well as being the inspiration for Edmond Rostand s best known work, the play titled Cyrano de Bergerac In the fascinating introduction to A Voyage To The Moon, we learnabout Cyrano he did serve in the Guards an elite unit of noble young men of his day and he was not a Gascon by birth, but by the force of his personality His feud with the actor Montfleury was real, and so was Bergerac s infamous nose It appears Cyrano de Bergerac was a real person He wrote poetry, plays, and books, as well as being the inspiration for Edmond Rostand s best known work, the play titled Cyrano de Bergerac In the fascinating introduction to A Voyage To The Moon, we learnabout Cyrano he did serve in the Guards an elite unit of noble young men of his day and he was not a Gascon by birth, but by the force of his personality His feud with the actor Montfleury was real, and so was Bergerac s infamous nose It appears in all the portraits, of which there are four And in all of these it is the same not a little ugly nose, flat at the top and projecting at the bottom in a little long gable turned up at the end but a large, generous, well shaped nose, hooked rather than retrouss , and planted squarely in the symmetrical middle of the face not ridiculous, but monumental Cyrano himself describes it in a play that I would love to be able to read, since according to the author of the introduction, Cyrano was responsible for introducing to the stage the comical peasant which Moliere later relied upon in his own works But back to The Nose Here is what Cyrano says about it in his play Le Pedant Joue ComedyThis veridic nose arrives everywhere a quarter of an hour before its master Ten shoemakers, good round fat ones too, go and sit down to work under it out of the rain Of course he was the only person ever allowed to say anything about The Nose Many duels were fought over it, andthan ten men were killed because of it So this passage from Chapter 15 of A Voyage To The Moon is obviously Cyrano s way of thumbing that Nose at the world Cyrano had gone out for a walk and returned late for dinner, and explained to his hosts that no one told him the a clock when he asked, they merely made strange faces at him Then he learns how to tell time on the MoonHow, cried all the Company, did not you know by that, that they shewed you what it was a Clock Faith, said I, they might have held their great Noses in the Sun long enough, before I had understood what they meant It s a Commodity, said they, that saves them the Trouble of a Watch for with their Teeth they make so true a Dial, that when they would tell any Body the Hour of the day, they do nobut open their Lips, and the shadow of that Nose, falling upon their Teeth, like the Gnomon of a Sun Dial, makes the precise time Now that you may know the reason, why all People in this Country have great Noses as soon as a Woman is brought to Bed the Midwife carries the Child to the Master of the Seminary and exactly at the years end, the Skillful being assembled, if his Nose prove shorter than the standing Measure, which an Alderman keeps, he is judged to be a Flat Nose, and delivered over to be gelt You ll ask me, no doubt, the Reason of that Barbarous Custom, and how it comes to pass that we, amongst whom Virginity is a Crime, should enjoyn Continence by force but know that we do so, because after Thirty Ages experience we have observed, that a great Nose is the mark of a Witty, Courteous, Affable, Generous and Liberal Man and that a little Nose is a Sign of the contrary Wherefore of Flat Noses we make Eunuchs, because the Republick had rather have no Children at all than Children like them Well, enough about the man s nose, what about the book he wrote, right Okay This was great fun for me to read, especially considering that during Cyrano s day the debate was still raging about whether the Earth revolved around the sun or vice versa Imagine letting your imagination fly to the moon in those days How would you get there and what would you find when you landed Books with covers made of mother of pearl, and operated with a little key that you wound up long enough for the book to play you a chapter Towns that move according to the seasons of the year by using wheels and giant bellows built into the walls of the palaces, so that when activated they sail along like a ship at sea Other towers that are furnished with giant screws that will twist them down into the ground during bad storms The true reason that all good cooks are fat, even though they never seem to sit down and eat they get their nourishment from the steam coming out of their cooking pots Beds that are nothingthan layers of flowers three feet deep Cyrano s voyage gave him the chance to discuss philosophy, politics and the origins of Man with the people of the Moon, which of course meant he was able to share his own ideas on those topics Sometimes I got a bit lost during these discussions, but mostly I could follow along without too many What Did He Say moments I thought the book was ingeniously clever I was absolutely delighted with all of it, and wish once again that I could have met and talked with Cyrano de Bergerac I very greatly doubt I could have kept up with his wit in person, but it would have been such fun to try


  2. qwerty qwerty says:

    must read must read


  3. Zadignose Zadignose says:

    The ignorant man who thinks he s smart only because he has a diploma has to answer me This is a remarkable book that is very clever, entertaining, and thought provoking Elsewhere, I have referred to it as wise and foolish in equal measure, and thus great fun It may be difficult to discern from the book just what the author may have actually thought, and I m sure that is intentional At times he s having us on At other times, he s presenting some pretty radical ideas and reflections which The ignorant man who thinks he s smart only because he has a diploma has to answer me This is a remarkable book that is very clever, entertaining, and thought provoking Elsewhere, I have referred to it as wise and foolish in equal measure, and thus great fun It may be difficult to discern from the book just what the author may have actually thought, and I m sure that is intentional At times he s having us on At other times, he s presenting some pretty radical ideas and reflections which may have been a bit too controversial for him to own, so he has ridiculous moon atheists proclaim these ideas while his own character is befuddled, and sometimes offers rather lame, ineffectual objections.The book s ending is rather abrupt, yet I don t know whether the continuation in the sequel The States and Empires of the Sun makes up for this minor defect.Perhaps many readers are unaware of the fact that such a man as Cyrano actually existed He s best known, certainly, through the fictional portrayal of his character in Rostand s play But it s very exciting to experience the language and thoughts of the real Cyrano, a poet and playwright with panache who was an accomplished duelist and soldier, who had a big nose, and who wrote fantasies about magical travels to the moon It was interesting to see how Rostand drew not just from some of the details of Cyrano s life, but also from his writing, to arrive at the idea of using poetry as a form of currency to pay bakers for the cakes we eat, and the detailed description of several fantastic methods of space travel.Speaking of influence, Italo Calvino surely acknowledged his debt to Cyrano, but I didn t realize just how close a part of this book came to what Calvino later developed in his story The Distance of the Moon While some of Cyrano s philosophical ramblings may seem laughable, in other ways he seems way ahead of his times While reading, I noted once or twice wrong, but right in principle E.g., he comes from ideas relating to the four basic elements of classical times, but he tries to argue that matter is essentially one substance He then goes on to describe different shaped particles with their own qualities He s not right in specifics, yet he forecasts atomic theory in some sense, his differently shaped particles aren t radically unlike the notion of atoms defined by their differing numbers of protons and the resultant properties, and he presents concepts such as that the matter we view macroscopically is mostly void, with tiny particles at a relatively great distance to one another.Among other things he seems to get right, though they weren t yet established scientific beliefs, were a heliocentric universe, and the placebo effect which he theorizes as a rational explanation for faith healing denying such a miracle, and he presents this a century before the placebo effect is first investigated by John Haygarth He also proposes something similar to Pascal s wager as an argument for religious faith it s better to believe in a non existent God than to disbelieve an existent one , yet he may be making a mockery of it here, and he s doing so decades before Pascal proposes it in his Pensees.Cyrano writes some perfectly silly stuff I thought it entertaining how his character, a mostly calm and rational type, was prone to the occasional irrational outburst, which created quite a bit of trouble for him, including having religiously offended the prophet Elijah and thus missing his opportunity for a free taste of an apple from the tree of knowledge though he steals one, it is contaminated by a poison skin that causes forgetfulness and confusion Anyway, he may be a perfectly patient and attentive student on some days, but at table he might rudely burst out with Where the hell is that soup Among the persuasive arguments that Cyrano cleverly disavows by putting it into the mouth of another is the argument against honoring elders and parents Surely, it s fine to respect our parents if they are wise, but otherwise trample with rage on the belly of the father who begat you and the breast of the mother who conceived you do you imagine that the cowardly respect that vicious parents have ripped from your weakness is so pleasing to Heaven that it will thereby lengthen your years I don t think so Unlike other wits, in the years gone and the years to come, Cyrano singles out some individuals in the real world to praise, but in expressing condemnation he avoids naming names This doesn t seem to proceed from any particular fear, but seems gentlemanly in character E.g I also met a number of other people that your world treats as divines but found in them nothing but a lot of babble and pride There is no need to call out his specific literary or political rivals for this pronouncement to hold weight I think we can all relate.There s so much magical fun and goofiness in this rather short book, I don t want to spoil all of it, while I have notes on so much of it Maybe, just as a teaser, I ll put in one little quote sans context, and leave the rest for the book to say on its own You destroy the cabbage s soul when you kill it, but in killing a man you simply give him a change of address


  4. Vivian Vivian says:

    Wildly heretical.Published posthumously, and probably for the best considering the content Even with the liberal editing deletions by his friend prior to press But remember that Gallileo was forced to recant his theories in 1633 and Voyage to the Moon was published 24 years laters, two years after De Bergerac s death Clearly written earlier and it is a forceful pro testa, for the thesis and for science Predating Swift s Gulliver s Travels yet I couldn t help but think what a wonderful compar Wildly heretical.Published posthumously, and probably for the best considering the content Even with the liberal editing deletions by his friend prior to press But remember that Gallileo was forced to recant his theories in 1633 and Voyage to the Moon was published 24 years laters, two years after De Bergerac s death Clearly written earlier and it is a forceful pro testa, for the thesis and for science Predating Swift s Gulliver s Travels yet I couldn t help but think what a wonderful comparison read.A forerunner of science fiction and rather scathing rebukes Clearly somethings aren t as we understand them, now, but some are prescient As I opened the Box, I found within somewhat of Metal, almost like to our Clocks, full of I know not what little Springs and imperceptible Engines It was a Book, indeed but a Strange and Wonderful Book, that had neither Leaves nor Letters In fine, it was a Book made wholly for the Ears, and not the Eyes So that when any Body has a mind to read in it, he winds up that Machine with a great many Strings then he turns the Hand to the Chapter which he desires to hear, and straight, as from the Mouth of a Man, or a Musical Instrument, proceed all the distinct and different Sounds, 3 which theLunar Grandees make use of for expressing their Thoughts, instead of Language.The flying travel box gives off Dr Who vibesDe Bergerac clearly has some thoughts about Man as given dominion Moses, the greatest of Philosophers, who drew the Knowledge of Nature from the Fountain Head, Nature her self, hinted this truth to us when he spoke of the Tree of Knowledge and without doubt he intended to intimate to us under that Figure, that Plants, in Exclusion to Mankind, possess perfect Philosophy Remember, then, O thou Proudest of Animals that though a Cabbage which thou cuttest sayeth not a Word, yet it pays it at Thinking but the poor Vegetable has no fit Organs to howl as you do, nor yet to frisk it about, and weep Yet, it hath those that are proper to complain of the Wrong you do it, and to draw a Judgement from Heaven upon you for the Injustice.Perhaps the most well known aspect of Cyrano De Bergerac is his nose as made famous in the play by Rostan While it is exaggerated, his nose was quite prodigious I love this bit about noses included amongst the sociological discussions of the Moon World B ecause after Thirty Ages experience we have observed, that a great Nose is the mark of a Witty, Courteous, Affable, Generous and Liberal Man and that a little Nose is a Sign of the contrary Wherefore of Flat Noses we make Eunuchs, because the Republick had rather have no Children at all than Children like them NOTE This is book is widely available for free, LEGALLY So if you are interested, look around and Gutenberg.org is always a good resource for some older works if not available otherwise


  5. Nathan Jerpe Nathan Jerpe says:

    So science fiction written before The Enlightenment isn t that an oxymoron A Voyage to the Moon belongs on a shelf with Gulliver s Travels, Gargantua and Pantagruel, and Candide, but I suspect you ll have trouble finding the book in English, which is a shame Fortunately Google Books has an electronic late seventeenth century translation that comes with some great illustrations This is the edition that I have read It sometimes takes a little work to tease out the meaning or the punchline So science fiction written before The Enlightenment isn t that an oxymoron A Voyage to the Moon belongs on a shelf with Gulliver s Travels, Gargantua and Pantagruel, and Candide, but I suspect you ll have trouble finding the book in English, which is a shame Fortunately Google Books has an electronic late seventeenth century translation that comes with some great illustrations This is the edition that I have read It sometimes takes a little work to tease out the meaning or the punchline from these old, roundabout sentences, but it is definitely worth it, and a far cry from the difficulty of deciphering, say, Shakespeare or Milton.Cyrano, our narrator of the famous nose, contrives a plan to visit The Moon without rockets, cannons, or a vehicle of any kind instead, he reasons that if The Sun would pull up the dew from the grass, then he need only carry a bunch of bottles full of dew, and The Sun would pull him to The Moon This first plan backfires for Cyrano and he ends up landing in New France Canada , but after several other deranged attempts he is set upon his way, where he goes on to explore The Moon throughout the rest of the book.Scientific discussions are most interesting when they are logical, convincing, and lead to conclusions that are not only incorrect but utterly absurd Who s to say that in the 21st century, we are not guilty of the same thing Once Cyrano has reached The Moon, this book basically becomes a series of such discussions, but I don t see this as a disappointment what it lacks in traditional SF tropes it makes up for with clever, witty, and often bewildering arguments that shows us how alien The Moon s inhabitants are for instance their speech is similar to music, so that whenever Cyrano introduces a member of The Moon s royalty, their name is transcribed as a little staff with several notes on it Coupled with all this is the fact that Cyrano was writing nearly four hundred years ago, which leads us to wonder whether he might even believe some of this stuff In any case, if you are interested in the history of science or science fiction, or just want to bask in some French Renaissance lunacy, then this one might be worth picking up


  6. Ευθυμία Δεσποτάκη Ευθυμία Δεσποτάκη says:

    , .


  7. Pierre E. Loignon Pierre E. Loignon says:

    Lorsque je suis tomb sur ce bouquin, par hasard, dans une librairie d occasion, j ai d abord cru qu il s agissait d une dition particuli rement volumineuse de la pi ce de Rostand En y regardant de plus pr s, j ai vu que le titre tait plut t L autre monde ou les tats et empires de la lune et du soleil et je me demandais alors ce que le nom de Cyrano de Bergerac pouvait bien venir faire l jusqu ce que je r alise qu il en tait tout simplement l auteur H oui Cyrano de Bergerac, ce person Lorsque je suis tomb sur ce bouquin, par hasard, dans une librairie d occasion, j ai d abord cru qu il s agissait d une dition particuli rement volumineuse de la pi ce de Rostand En y regardant de plus pr s, j ai vu que le titre tait plut t L autre monde ou les tats et empires de la lune et du soleil et je me demandais alors ce que le nom de Cyrano de Bergerac pouvait bien venir faire l jusqu ce que je r alise qu il en tait tout simplement l auteur H oui Cyrano de Bergerac, ce personnage embl matique du th tre et du cin ma fran ais fut d abord un personnage historique qui, entre autre, crivait.Ce Cyrano r el, abordons la question sans plus attendre, avait effectivement un grand nez il en existe toujours quelques portraits et aimait s en moquer tout en se montrant tr s susceptible ce sujet Dans son Voyage sur la lune, tous les lunaires ont d ailleurs le nez long, et Cyrano s en fait ainsi expliquer la raison par l un deux Maintenant, afin que vous sachiez pourquoi en ce pays tout le monde a le nez grand, apprenez qu aussit t que la femme est accouch e, la matrone porte l enfant au Prieur du S minaire et justement au bout de l an les experts tant assembl s, si son nez est trouv plus court qu une certaine mesure que tient le Syndic, il est cens camus, et mis entre les mains des gens qui le ch trent Vous me demanderez la cause de cette barbarie, et comme il se peut faire que nous chez qui la virginit est un crime, tablissons des continences par force Mais sachez que nous le faisons apr s avoir observ depuis trente si cles qu un grand nez est le signe d un homme spirituel, courtois, affable, g n reux, lib ral, et que le petit est un signe du contraire Voyage sur la lune, 119 C est donc en glissant son regard par dessus son grand nez que le vrai Cyrano, homme sans aucun doute spirituel, courtois, affable, g n reux et lib ral, a crit, outre ses r cits de voyages astraux, des lettres, des po mes et une pi ce de th tre Son criture est vraiment particuli re Elle est tr s vive et nerveuse On y passe de r flexions philosophiques inspir s de Gassendi et Descartes, des descriptions d inventions technologiques souvent tr s ing nieuses d une fus e lunaire et d un walk man notamment , des conversations fantaisistes avec le d mon de Socrate, des oiseaux, etc., des r cits d aventure de vols, rencontres et m me d vasions Ses r cits de voyages sur la lune et le soleil sont parfaitement ridicules au premier abord, mais contiennent tellement de formules ing nieuses et amusantes, tellement d inventions m caniques et de r flexions philosophiques que m me le plus r calcitrant cette lecture se laissera gagner.Le Cyrano historique, serait aussi, comme le rapporte Rostand, bel et bien mort des suites d une pi ce de bois qui lui est tomb sur la t te, et il aurait aussi effectivement tenu t te cent hommes la porte de Nesle On ne lui conna t pas, non plus, malheureusement pour lui, de succ s amoureux.Vraiment, nez compris, le vrai Cyrano ne fait pas pi tre figure si on le compare au personnage de th tre auquel son destin l a fait aboutir PS Je r alise que l dition plus ancienne que j ai trouv e d occasion comprend, en plus du voyage sur la lune qu on retrouve dans toutes les ditions plus r centes , celui que Cyrano a ensuite fait sur le soleil et qui est g n ralement laiss de c t Un ajout pourtant important si on d sire conna tre la mani re dont les philosophes vivent dans les toiles ou encore la perception des oiseaux sur l humanit


  8. Dfordoom Dfordoom says:

    I m fascinated by very very early science fiction novels and one of the most important of these pioneering works is Cyrano de Bergerac s Journey to the Moon or to give it its proper title L Autre Monde o les tats et Empires de la Lune The Other World The States and Empires of the Moon It was published posthumously in 1657.Cyrano de Bergerac 1619 1655 was an interesting figure in his own right He was a successful playwright and a notorious duellist He is said to have fought at least 1 I m fascinated by very very early science fiction novels and one of the most important of these pioneering works is Cyrano de Bergerac s Journey to the Moon or to give it its proper title L Autre Monde o les tats et Empires de la Lune The Other World The States and Empires of the Moon It was published posthumously in 1657.Cyrano de Bergerac 1619 1655 was an interesting figure in his own right He was a successful playwright and a notorious duellist He is said to have fought at least 1,000 duels And yes, he really did have a very large nose and this was the cause of many of his duels He was also a homosexual and a religious sceptic who was accused of atheism And to add to all that he was something of an amateur philosopher and scientific thinker.Like most of the early fantastic voyage science fiction tales the intention behind Journey to the Moon was largely satirical What makes this work really interesting though is that this was by no means Cyrano s only intention The book is like a blend of whimsical fantasy, satire and hard science fiction Or at least the 17th century version of hard science fiction Cyrano s scientific speculations are an intriguing mix of the medieval and the modern In this context it s worth remembering that Cyrano was writing several decades before Newton put physics on a firm scientific basis While Cyrano has no notion that a lack of breathable air might be an obstacle to a lunar voyage he is aware that the earth s gravitational field ispowerful than that of the Moon.There s also some interesting speculation on the nature of reason and on the differences between humans and animals At times Cyrano almost seems to be moving towards some kind of theory of parallel and divergent evolutionary pathways.As for the plot itself, this is where the whimsy comes in Dew is certainly an original idea for a fuel for interplanetary travel The hero uses this means to reach the Moon, where he finds that the inhabitants of our satellite regard the Earth as their moon They also have some odd customs and ideas on social organisation They believe in paying respect to youth rather than age They find it strange when Cyrano tells them that the inhabitants of Earth wear swords as a symbol of honour on the Moon they regard phalluses in the way 17th century Europeans regarded swords.It s a very short book and while it s thin on plot and long on philosophical speculation Cyrano s speculations are generally entertaining And it s a fascinating attempt to imagine a society based on fundamentally different beliefs.If you re interested in the history of science fiction it s essential reading


  9. Orçun Orçun says:

    Cyrano de Bergerac, Samsatl Lukianos un nc l n yapt fantastik yolculuk temal bu kitab yla, bilim kurgunun ilk rneklerinden birini 17 yy da ortaya koymu Asl nda bu k k kitapta bir ok t r n kesi imini g r yoruz Teoloji, ku kuculuk ve R nesans ok ltizmini sentezleyen bir felsefi roman say labilir di er yandan, Ay daki ya am hem tuhaf ve hayali y nleri, hem de rasyonel y nleri olan masals bir yar topya olarak betimlenmi d nyadaki uygarl n ele tirildi i belli k s mlarda ise, m Cyrano de Bergerac, Samsatl Lukianos un nc l n yapt fantastik yolculuk temal bu kitab yla, bilim kurgunun ilk rneklerinden birini 17 yy da ortaya koymu Asl nda bu k k kitapta bir ok t r n kesi imini g r yoruz Teoloji, ku kuculuk ve R nesans ok ltizmini sentezleyen bir felsefi roman say labilir di er yandan, Ay daki ya am hem tuhaf ve hayali y nleri, hem de rasyonel y nleri olan masals bir yar topya olarak betimlenmi d nyadaki uygarl n ele tirildi i belli k s mlarda ise, metin bir yergiye d n yor Sadece yaz ld zamana g re de il, g n m z i in bile ilgin bir anlat olmakla birlikte, biraz da n k ilerledi ini, felsefi diyaloglar n baz lar n biraz uzun buldu umu belirtmeliyim Asl nda, felsefeden ok hayal g c i eriyor o diyaloglar da belki edebiyat g z yle okumak gerekiyor


  10. Al Bità Al Bità says:

    A delightful read Bergerac uses the conceit of travelling to another world populated by sentient, intelligent beings, whose ideas of life and living are different from those on earth Thus the author can legitimately present alternative world views, and present philosophical arguments for and against different conceptions The book then becomes a sort of time capsule of the times in which Bergerac lived, using the rather primitive to our eyes scientific ideas of the time although to be hon A delightful read Bergerac uses the conceit of travelling to another world populated by sentient, intelligent beings, whose ideas of life and living are different from those on earth Thus the author can legitimately present alternative world views, and present philosophical arguments for and against different conceptions The book then becomes a sort of time capsule of the times in which Bergerac lived, using the rather primitive to our eyes scientific ideas of the time although to be honest, doesn t every child at heart dream of having a space ship powered only by balloons yet can operate as a way of opening his readers minds to the possibilities that there are alternative concepts of morality and customs than one s own


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