Across The Plains In 1844 PDF ñ Across The MOBI

Across The Plains In 1844 PDF ñ Across The MOBI


Across The Plains In 1844 [Download] ✤ Across The Plains In 1844 Author Catherine Sager Pringle – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages Because we believe this work is c This scarce Plains In PDF/EPUB ã antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world s literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

  • Paperback
  • 48 pages
  • Across The Plains In 1844
  • Catherine Sager Pringle
  • English
  • 13 October 2017
  • 1419104608

About the Author: Catherine Sager Pringle

Is a Plains In PDF/EPUB ã well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Across The Plains In book, this is one of the most wanted Catherine Sager Pringle author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “Across The Plains In 1844

  1. Jean Jean says:

    Across the Plains in 1844by Catherine Sager is the story of the Sager family s trip over the Oregon Trail by wagon in 1844 Sager s first hand story was written in 1855 but never published beyond Oregon until 1989 What I like about this Kindle version published in 2013 is the addition of maps, photos, drawings but most of all the insertion of the editor s notes to explain the situation, add historical clarification or related information explaining life at that time.Catherine s parents diedAcross the Plains in 1844by Catherine Sager is the story of the Sager family s trip over the Oregon Trail by wagon in 1844 Sager s first hand story was written in 1855 but never published beyond Oregon until 1989 What I like about this Kindle version published in 2013 is the addition of maps, photos, drawings but most of all the insertion of the editor s notes to explain the situation, add historical clarification or related information explaining life at that time.Catherine s parents died of illness on the trip Catherine had fallen under the wagon and the wheel ran over her leg breaking it The German physician who set her leg helped the Shaws take care of all the children five girls and two boys William Shaw was the Wagon Train Commander The children were left with the Whitmans until the Shaws could build a home and send for them Whitman was a physician and with his wife they treated the local native Americans and operated a missionary school Catherine provides a moving story of what life was like on the Oregon trail and at the Whitman s She also provides a detailed firsthand account of the Whitman Massacre She and a few children were the only survivors The Shaws came for them and she lived out her life in Willamette Oregon Three of the girls were the only survivors of the trip to Oregon.This is an exceptionally well written memoir of life in 1844 The day to day details from a child s viewpoint makes it a most interesting read The book is short at 39 pages so it is easy to read in one sitting I am including this book in the books I am reading about women for March as it is Women s History Month

  2. Jessaka Jessaka says:

    Pioneer story I guess, but it isof who survived on the trip out west and who didn t This wasn t what I would call a fun read instead what she went through, and what the people went through was horrendous It isn t even a story that tells you what it was like traveling or how the people survived, but it wasof a story of who died, who got killed and why I bought it for 99 cents on kindle, and it was worth the read for historical reasons.

  3. Ian Ian says:

    Catherine Sager was one of 7 siblings who set out with their parents from Missouri to Oregon in 1844, right at the beginning of the great wagon train migrations She herself was around 9 years old at the start of the journey Both her parents died during the crossing and on arriving in Oregon the Sager children were placed in the care of Dr and Mrs Whitman, missionaries who worked with the local Native American peoples Only 3 years later Catherine survived the Whitman Massacre , in which her Catherine Sager was one of 7 siblings who set out with their parents from Missouri to Oregon in 1844, right at the beginning of the great wagon train migrations She herself was around 9 years old at the start of the journey Both her parents died during the crossing and on arriving in Oregon the Sager children were placed in the care of Dr and Mrs Whitman, missionaries who worked with the local Native American peoples Only 3 years later Catherine survived the Whitman Massacre , in which her adoptive parents and 12 other people were killed by Native Americans enraged because swathes of their people were dying of a measles epidemic brought by a wagon train of emigrants.Basically then by the age of 12 Catherine Sager had experienced enough mental trauma for a dozen lifetimes, but she tells her story in a matter of fact style that was not untypical of the era You can tell though that she wasn t a professional writer Although her account of the Massacre is dramatic, it is at times quite confusing My edition had some helpful explanatory notes from the editor, which made sense of the sequence of events, and I was glad of them.This is actually a very short book It can comfortably be read in an hour It is nevertheless a remarkable account of the earliest days of the Oregon Trail

  4. Carolyn Carolyn says:

    If you ever had romantic ideas about travelling in a wagon train or living as a pioneer in Indian country in the 19th century, this book will cure you of it A gripping read that keeps you turning pages or flipping through your kindle , this is not a book to miss One of the things that struck me were the extremes of kindness and cruelty in human nature that were so vividly on display in this book A true historical account that must be read by anyone interested in our country s past.

  5. ☆Ruth☆ ☆Ruth☆ says:

    I found this title a little misleading There is some description of the author s journey across the plains but most of the narrative concerns her time spent with the Whitman s and the subsequent massacre at their home It s a succinct personal account, lacking in detail and emotion, which somehow enhances the shocking brutality of the events and left me wondering how anyone could survive this kind of horror and remain sane There are a few notes and maps but I felt the story deserved ar I found this title a little misleading There is some description of the author s journey across the plains but most of the narrative concerns her time spent with the Whitman s and the subsequent massacre at their home It s a succinct personal account, lacking in detail and emotion, which somehow enhances the shocking brutality of the events and left me wondering how anyone could survive this kind of horror and remain sane There are a few notes and maps but I felt the story deserved arobust historical framework It would have been very helpful to have had additional, pertinent information for someone like me who has very limited knowledge of this period in American history

  6. Erin Dixon Erin Dixon says:

    A good short book if you can call it that only 35 pages It details the harrowing ordeal of a family traveling the trails in 1844 to Oregon What the family endures is horrific I read it to inform myselfof the trials and tribulation of life on the trail to what many hoped was a better life It was helpful to my teaching this part of history to my students.

  7. Eileen Mary P. Haden Eileen Mary P. Haden says:

    ExcellentFactual, blunt, and enlighteningFast reading and briefEnjoyable but sad story by a courageous female survivorA quick historical read

  8. Diana Blick Diana Blick says:

    Difficult for modern peopleThis is a rather graphic eye witness account of life on the Oregon Trail in the 1840s, including the Whitman Massacre The style of writing is not attractive to us of the 21st century nor are her descriptions and appellations of native Americans politically correct However, if one considers the state of war between the two races at the time and the fact that she observed a number of people she loved murdered, then a certain latitude for the ideas of the day might be Difficult for modern peopleThis is a rather graphic eye witness account of life on the Oregon Trail in the 1840s, including the Whitman Massacre The style of writing is not attractive to us of the 21st century nor are her descriptions and appellations of native Americans politically correct However, if one considers the state of war between the two races at the time and the fact that she observed a number of people she loved murdered, then a certain latitude for the ideas of the day might be allowed The value here is that this is one of the few accounts from that time and place If one balances what one reads with accounts from the native American side, say accounts of Sand Creek and Wounded Knee, it would be apparent that savagery was perpetrated on both sides, and that understanding history is rarely comfortable Reading accounts from the time will not spare our sensibilities, but it is still the best way to find out what really happened Still, I would caution those who need safe spaces from modern life or those with difficulty dealing with unvarnished life to avoid this book because nothing is spared here in description

  9. Ashley Hathaway Ashley Hathaway says:

    Read this as a followup to Treasured Grace by Tracie Peterson A very brief accounting of Catherine s journey along the Oregon Trail I assume she s written this after the fact since her speech and grammar areadvanced than that of a petrified 13 year old During her account of the Whitman Massacre, she was obviously in shock and therefore wrote with few details, leaving me kind of wishing forAlthough the events during the 2 weeks she was in captivity were horrific, I followed up b Read this as a followup to Treasured Grace by Tracie Peterson A very brief accounting of Catherine s journey along the Oregon Trail I assume she s written this after the fact since her speech and grammar areadvanced than that of a petrified 13 year old During her account of the Whitman Massacre, she was obviously in shock and therefore wrote with few details, leaving me kind of wishing forAlthough the events during the 2 weeks she was in captivity were horrific, I followed up by reading about it in Wikipedia It provided a better understanding as to the Indian s motivation behind the attack so you can understand how the events played out and why To quote Mrs Whitman those poor children

  10. Tina Tina says:

    An engrossing account of tragedy in a young girl s life whose family traveled the Oregon Trail.The reality of this memoir is staggering to comprehend in such a young girl s life The trail ride, living at the mission, and personal account of an Indian massacre combine into an account that informs and shocks the reader with such a vast amount of tragedies in such a short period of time.

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